Monday, November 9, 2009

Next Contest at the Rondeau Roundup: A Triolet Challenge

The first two contests at the Rondeau Roundup have been rondeau contests, so it's time to mix it up a bit with another form.

The next contest at the Rondeau Roundup is a Triolet Challenge!

Not familiar with the form? It's an eight-line poem with a strict rhyme scheme:

explanation courtesy
Triolet

The features of the Triolet are:

* 8 lines.
* Two rhymes.
* 5 of the 8 lines are repeated or refrain lines.
* First line repeats at the 4th and 7th lines.
* Second line repeats at the 8th line.
* Rhyme scheme (where an upper-case letter indicates the appearance of an identical line, while a lower-case letter indicates a rhyme with each line designated by the same lower-case or upper-case letter):

A
B
a - Rhymes with 1st line.
A - Identical to 1st line.
a - Rhymes with 1st line.
b - Rhymes with 2nd line.
A - Identical to 1st line.
B - Identical to 2nd line.


Here's another explanation, courtesy poets.org
Triolet

For this contest, I'll accept two(*2*) triolets per entrant, since the form is only eight lines long. For this contest, there is no theme, but only triolets can win. No other form will be accepted. There is no entry fee.

First prize: $25 gift certificate from Amazon.com
Up to five More than Honorable Mentions will also be chosen to appear on the Rondeau Roundup Blog.

Contest opens December 1, 2009 and closes December 28, 2009. Winners will be notified by January 15, 2010.

Send your triolets to
rondeauroundup(at)gmail.com (replace (at) with @)

in the body of an e-mail message.
No attachments, please. If entering two triolets, put both in the same e-mail.

Here's a sample triolet by your Rondeau mistress to give you an idea of what the form can do:

Triolet for Janis

A Today I need your Texas wail,
B your ragged voice of pain and hurt;
a I need to walk your lonely trail.
A Today I need your Texas wail
a to buoy me up when I grow frail,
b to pick me up from ash and dirt.
A Today I need your Texas wail,
B that ragged voice of pain and hurt.

Allison Joseph

(rhyme scheme marked next to poem for illustrative purposes; you need not include it with your submission)

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